Hot drinks and brushing after you drink it

Our mouths work in ways that are quite mysterious to us. Growing up, we were constantly told to brush our teeth after every meal and twice a day at least. Now that we’ve reached this boring adult stage, we know that a lot of the things we know about dental care are still insufficient. Where the mouth is concerned, a lot of knowledge we have is also taken for granted. Like, did you know that athletes have a severe risk of developing dental infections? Because the amount they work out causes dry mouth and fluctuating alkaline levels which is bad for their teeth?

Similarly, we have heard loads of things about drinking too very hot stuff and too very cold stuff and the damages it can cause to your enamel. But, how much of it is true and how much of an unlearning do you have to do to make sure you’re avoiding these mistakes?

DentoXpert (https://dentoxpert.com/) gives you some insight. Read on to find out.

Something we take for granted

  • Coffee and tea might be your best friends for life, but let us tell you why they’re actually against you landing your perfect Friday night date: ‘cos they cause dental stains and leave you with terrible breath from the acidic reaction it generates in your mouth. Obviously, you drink it hot too, which is so much more problematic than the drink itself.
  • If you’re anything like the small population of lazy adults who prefer tea over toothbrush first thing in the morning, you’re in for a rude (all pun intended) shock! Your mouth, first thing in the morning, is the playground for bacteria and when you don’t brush first thing in the morning and subject your mouth to both ruthless temperatures and strong acidic contents, your teeth will give way.
  • Some of us do this a lot more than some others and that is to alternate between hot and cold during a meal. You’re probably eating hella loads from your sizzling platter and swiping it down with ice cold beer. While this gives your taste buds a nice tropical escape, you’re subjecting your teeth to possible expensive crown treatments and root canals down the line.

So why is brushing bad, after drinking or eating something hot?

Okay, so, unlike the sensitivity that grips your roots when you brush away your enamel after drinking something cold, hot beverages have a more gripping effect on your teeth. Your gums have nerve endings that are very sensitive to temperatures and jerking it violently with hot things will cause your gums to recede in shock.

More than anything else, hot beverages causes corrosion all the way into your dentin and not just your enamel so then the whole tooth is affected right to the center.

Brushing immediately with fluoride will cause the dentin more damage as it is already so soft and vulnerable. This causes decay right in the middle of the teeth and you’ll be stuck with rotting cavity right at the center. So, to avoid this all, we should just make informed choices.

Article Categories:
Breath · Dental · Food · Teeth

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